Tasmania, Australia

What would it take for every child in Launceston Tamar Valley to be loved and safe by 2035?

Children in Launceston Tamar Valley are over-represented in family violence incidents, which affects a local child every second day (on average). Twice as many of our children are assaulted than those in the rest of Tasmania. More kids are hospitalised due to injury than in other places.

Posted by Sharon on the 29th Jun 2015.

 

The statistics mentioned come from the State of Launceston's Children report which was published in July 2014, providing a baseline measure of how we are doing. Community consultations occurred from August 2014 to February 2015, and Community Committees in each area (George Town, Beaconsfield, Waverley/St Leonards, Northern Suburbs/Lilydale, Ravenswood) have discussed the data collected.

Now it's over to you. We want to know what it would take for every child to be loved and safe- in the home, in the street, in the neighbourhood, in the community.

Stoney - When I grew up in Ravenswood I remember having neighborhood houses with a yellow sign attached in nearly every street so if you felt unsafe you could go to the door for help maybe bring this back so kids feel safe in local areas

Sharon - Hi Stoney. Yes I remember those yellow signs too. Apparently they have a program like that in Palmerston in the NT and here's some info from that page but unfortunately MadeOpen wont let me post the link. I'm trying to get whatever bug it is fixed so I can post more information since I think this is a brilliant idea!

Sharon - Here's the safety house link from the police in the Northern Territory http://www.pfes.nt.gov.au/Police/Young-people/Safety-house.aspx

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Katherinebrooks - Education education education. We care givers need to feel loved and safe so that we can role model this to our children and them to theirs

Sharon - Very true Katie...what do you think this could look like?

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Vic - education,love support and community being active in wanting a better place .vic

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trish - Support them & also stop & listen to them. Let them know who's a safe person/place to go to if a stranger harasses them

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Vic - more programs eg; like drum beat training or positive role models with in the community more trained leaders for Girl Guides .

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MichelleR - How can we help children lean to manage their emotions when they become overwhelmed?

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EvArcher - Close/easy access to a child health nurse.

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EvArcher - Child care in Lilydale so that young children are not left home alone when parents go to work.

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Vic - Want to give kids strategies to cope and deal with what happens in their life, including the poverty cycle and how to break it with out turning to alcohol and drugs.7270

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Vic - Recent drug issues have impacted on the community making people feel unsafe. More police monitoring at the skate park to get rid of the drug and lessen the fights.7270

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Vic - I want everyone to have a good perception of Beaconsfield, a good name, not like the current reputation of low/socio economic drug availability .7270

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TrudiC - Help parents to raise their children in safe, secure, loving relationships. Parenting doesn't come with a handbook and I can't count the amount of times parents have said to me "I don't want to yell and loose my temper, but I don't know what to do and I get so frustrated". Parents are asking for help and always wondering when the next parenting course will be. Right now the schedule of courses is really irregular and funding dependent. I truly believe that a regular schedule of quality parenting programs that focus on communication, helping to identify emotions, and empowering parents would have a big impact in keeping children safe at home. To be able to tell a parent who was at their wits end that there was help in gaining new skills and being able to give an exact date of when the next course would be is something I would love to se happen here in George Town.

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trish - Have more police presence especially for 7270

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PDSStaff - What currently works well - Providing programs that make these high risk kids feel wanted and to know they are valued and supported when they don’t get care at home.

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PDSStaff - Small groups and one on one therapy based programs.

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PDSStaff - DRUMBEAT gives students confidence. It provides a different structure to normal therapy – students trust our student networker and open up. It connects families who have also participated in the program.

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PDSStaff - Parent/student support programs.

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PDSStaff - Community Parent Program – improving parent’s skills in raising/loving children. Breakfast Club – loving/caring/nutritious start to the day supported by trusted, familiar faces. Art Therapy – expressing emotions through artistic endeavours. DRUMBEAT – Promotes confidence/expression and is a great outlet to release pent up emotions and become calm.

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PDSStaff - Providing people to facilitate easy contact without the formal requirements of a teacher/student relationship. We need more time/people (more of the same).

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PDSStaff - Working in smaller groups gives students a greater opportunity to make a positive relationship and make a positive connection.

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PDSStaff - What is needed? - A supportive home/school environment. A range of trusting/trustworthy adults. Skills to make positive relationships. More time and more role models/volunteers. Community involvement in the school. Knowledge about local environment/businesses that are safe.

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PDSStaff - What is needed? Further intervention to decrease violence/abuse in family’s homes. Education for all family members to promote services currently available. External support or intervention for mid-level issues. Follow up support to integrate recommendations.

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pvlucas - We need to develop evidence based programs for men who use violence in family settings and help them understand how this harms their children. We must invest in research that identifies: 1 - what works in helping men develop alternatives to violence and 2 - what will help men understand the harms that exposure to family violence can have on their children.

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Elainz - lots of ideas from the work we do in New Zealand... celebrate great parenting (cos lots of it exists) by creating a photographic exhibition/ competition in the lead up to Fathers and Mothers Days.. we have 'Westie Dads in Action' and 'Marvellous Mum Moments'. People send in their favourite family photos and they are put into a display in a local spot/spots like malls/ libraries etc. (ideally attended by representatives of services for parents and with lots of info available) People vote for their favourites (also works well on line) Sponsors are found for prizes. Its a simple, low cost, high impact way of getting people to think about what great parenting looks like!

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Elainz - not be afraid of talking about the things that create a lack of safety... bullying, family violence. create small opportunities where it is safe to speak up. Get performing artists to create some small show that involved role play/ music/dance to promote the message that violence in any form is not OK. we have made an animated film Jade Speaks Up which is focused on children letting people know if they need help. I am coming over to BOFA and will bring some of our ideas with me

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Nicole000 - I would like to see programs such as "Circle Of Security" offered regularly to parents and carers not only in the George Town area but covering the entire Communities for Childrens' footprint. So as to help parents and carers understand why children do what they do and to give much needed skills and support to those who need it. I believe this would enable our children to grow up with the very best start.

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Nicole000 - I would love to see programs similar to the support given by the Family Violence Counselling Service offered to our children. For example.. How to recognise abusive behaviour, What can you do if you are being abused, What are the signals that can warn you of potential abuse in a partner. I would like to see this offered to young males and females as abuse is not gender biased. I would also like to see programs that teach positive behaviour. for example, young males may not know how to respond to a female who is being violent towards them and vice versa. Teaching young adults how to handle situations that are difficult and confusing.

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Nicole000 - I would love to see programs such as Shark Cage but modified for young people. A place where young people can express their emotions about abuse in a creative way and learn valuable skills along the way.

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TrudiC - Continue/look for ways to expand programs that help build the bond between parents and their children. Baby Massage is an example of a program that support parents to engage with the child, learn their cues etc. from birth. A flow through of programs that then build on the Baby Massage experience, or for those families who have missed massage and want to start as their baby gets a bit older, can continue that really focussed attention and engagement between parent and child. e.g. baby massage, followed on by a specialist baby playgroup, onto supported playgroup. Help parents to build that strong connection to their child and help them to understand what their children need and how to support them emotionally. Help parents to understand the appropriate developmental needs of their children during infancy so that they can recognise what behaviour is normal, what they can reasonably expect in terms of responsibility for children (eg. knowing that it isn't reasonable for a 5 year old to be in charge of a one year old while mum/dad are doing something else), and what children need from their parents to support their feeling loved and safe at home.

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dinailon - The issues raised in this question are complex and cannot be addressed in any one project. It will take a village to raise the loved and safe child. Loved and safe environments provide opportunities for learning, they ensure that all those who participate are healthy, and have the opportunity to acquire the material basics in life. The outcome of all of these is that children acquire a positive sense of culture and identity. This means that Loved and Safe incorporates all of the other questions being asked in the Made Open website. The membership of the Northern Early Years Group Tasmania (Inc) provide programs for parents and children in the education health and social sevices sectors. I suggest that projects that NEYG group members offer could be promoted and supported by Communities for Children. For example, Child and Family Centres (CFCs) create spaces that are owned by the communities in which they are located. Community members are proud of what they achieve here and take an active role in encouraging others in their community to join in the space and the activities that are offered. People who are involved in CFCs open up their hearts and minds to all the issues that their friends and neighbours need to address on a daily basis. It is not possible to articulate on Made Open all of the specific projects that need to be maintained or extended in services such as CFCs and other NEYG member organisations in 2016 and beyond. NEYG member organisations support the people in their communities to identify their needs and design projects that address those needs on an ongoing basis. NEYG has the capacity to identify key projects that group members generate and use a collective impact approach to provide additional support, linking and leveraging resources. Loved and safe means that people are welcomed unconditionally, in an environment of mutual respect. They are listened to without judgement, and are given the opportunity to solve problems for themselves and support others to do the same. We would hope that any projects funded by Communities for Children make loved and safe principles transparent.

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RavenswoodCommunityM - *B.A.P ( Being A Parent). I have done this course and found it very helpful. It helped me make my children feel more loved and safe. *Safe home *Being loved at home

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RavenswoodCommunityM - *More police to be present in the area. e.g. police to have more contact with the community (introducing themselves) *Neighbourhood Watch *Safe Homes

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RavenswoodCommunityM - Knowing there is someone to talk to. Youth Mentor who can connect with, feel safe, listened to and important.

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RavenswoodCommunityM - To feel secure in their own house/homes. To feel loved Less Crime More Police present Less Drugs

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RavenswoodCommunityM - Outreach - Visits to more homes to try and engage more families Outreach worker to help families with school age children who refuse to go to school or are unable to manage school - help with getting them back to school.

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RavenswoodCommunityM - Adopt a cop

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RavenswoodCommunityM - Intervention to decrease violence/abuse in family homes

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RavenswoodCommunityM - Programs for children around healthy relationships

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RavenswoodCommunityM - Respectful relationships programs

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yvetted - During discussion with service providers i have heard of this program called mentors in violence prevention

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yvetted - Mentors in violence prevention MVP is a highly successful violence prevention program created by Jackson Katz in the United States in 1993. MVP is an industry leader and was on the cutting edge in the early nineties, utilising a bystander approach to violence prevention. MVP is the premier program in the US working with hard to reach populations, such as college and professionals athletes the military on the issues of men's violence against women for almost two decades.

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yvetted - https://www.griffith.edu.au/criminology-law/violence-research-prevention-program/training-development

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